Parser/Composer library for Python https://fdik.org/pypeg2
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page "pyPEG – Grammar Elements", "counter-reset: chapter 1;" {
h1 id=gelements > Grammar Elements
p >>
ƒCaveat: pyPEG 2.x is written for Python 3. That means, it accepts
Unicode strings only. You can use it with Python 2.7 by writing
«u'string'» instead of «'string'» or with the following import (you
don't need that for Python 3):
>>
Code | from __future__ import unicode_literals
p >>
The samples in this documentation are written for Python 3, too. To
execute them with Python 2.7, you'll need this import:
>>
Code | from __future__ import print_function
p >>
pyPEG 2.x supports new-style classes only.
>>
h2 id=basic > Basic Grammar Elements
h3 id=literals > str instances and Literal
h4 > Parsing
p >>
A «str» instance as well as an instance of «pypeg2.Literal» is parsed
in the source text as a
`w "Terminal_and_nonterminal_symbols" > Terminal Symbol`.
It is removed and no result is put into the ∫Abstract syntax tree∫.
If it does not exist at the correct position in the source text,
a «SyntaxError» is raised.
>>
p > Example:
Code
||
>>> class Key(str):
... grammar = name(), ◊"="◊, restline, endl
...
>>> k = parse("this=something", Key)
>>> k.name
Symbol('this')
>>> k
'something'
||
h4 > Composing
p >>
«str» instances and «pypeg2.Literal» instances are being output
literally.
>>
p > Example:
Code
||
>>> class Key(str):
... grammar = name(), ◊"="◊, restline, endl
...
>>> k = Key("a value")
>>> k.name = Symbol("give me")
>>> compose(k)
'give me◊=◊a value\\n'
||
h3 id=regex > Regular Expressions
h4 > Parsing
p >>
ƒpyPEG uses Python's «re» module. You can use
πre.html#re-objects Python Regular Expression Objectsπ purely, or use
the «pypeg2.RegEx» encapsulation. Regular Expressions are parsed as
`w "Terminal_and_nonterminal_symbols" > Terminal Symbols`. The matching
result is put into the AST. If no match can be achieved, a
«SyntaxError» is raised.
>>
p >>
ƒpyPEG predefines different RegEx objects:
>>
glossary {
term 'word = re.compile(r"\w+")'
> Regular expression for scanning a word.
term 'restline = re.compile(r".*")'
> Regular expression for rest of line.
term 'whitespace = re.compile("(?m)\s+")'
> Regular expression for scanning whitespace.
term 'comment_sh = re.compile(r"\#.*")'
> Shell script style comment.
term 'comment_cpp = re.compile(r"//.*")'
> C++ style comment.
term 'comment_c = re.compile(r"(?m)/\*.*?\*/")'
> C style comment without nesting.
term 'comment_pas = re.compile(r"(?m)\(\*.*?\*\)")'
> Pascal style comment without nesting.
}
p > Example:
Code
||
>>> class Key(str):
... grammar = name(), "=", ◊restline◊, endl
...
>>> k = parse("this=something", Key)
>>> k.name
Symbol('this')
>>> k
◊'something'◊
||
h4 > Composing
p >>
For «RegEx» objects their corresponding value in the AST will be
output. If this value does not match the «RegEx» a «ValueError» is raised.
>>
p > Example:
Code
||
>>> class Key(str):
... grammar = name(), "=", ◊restline◊, endl
...
>>> k = Key(◊"a value"◊)
>>> k.name = Symbol("give me")
>>> compose(k)
'give me=◊a value\\n◊'
||
h3 id=tuple > tuple instances and Concat
h4 > Parsing
p >>
A «tuple» or an instance of «pypeg2.Concat» specifies, that different
things have to be parsed one after another. If not all of them parse in
their sequence, a «SyntaxError» is raised.
>>
p > Example:
Code
||
>>> class Key(str):
... grammar = name()◊, ◊"="◊, ◊restline◊, ◊endl
...
>>> k = parse("this=something", Key)
>>> k.name
Symbol('this')
>>> k
'something'
||
p >>
In a «tuple» there may be integers preceding another thing in the
«tuple». These integers represent a cardinality. For example, to parse
three times a «word», you can have as a «grammar»:
>>
Code | grammar = word, word, word
p > or:
Code | grammar = 3, word
p > which is equivalent. There are special cardinality values:
glossary {
term "-2, thing"
> «some(thing)»; this represents the plus cardinality, +
term "-1, thing"
> «maybe_some(thing)»; this represents the asterisk cardinality, *
term "0, thing"
> «optional(thing)»; this represents the question mark cardinality, ?
}
p >>
The special cardinality values can be generated with the
¬#some Cardinality Functions¬. Other negative values are reserved
and may not be used.
>>
h4 > Composing
p >>
For «tuple» instances and instances of «pypeg2.Concat» all attributes of
the corresponding thing (and elements of the corresponding collection
if that applies) in the AST will be composed and the result is
concatenated.
>>
p > Example:
Code
||
>>> class Key(str):
... grammar = name()◊, ◊"="◊, ◊restline◊, ◊endl
...
>>> k = Key("a value")
>>> k.name = Symbol("give me")
>>> compose(k)
◊'give me=a value\\n'◊
||
h3 id=lists > list instances
h4 > Parsing
p >>
A «list» instance which is not derived from «pypeg2.Concat» represents
different options. They're tested in their sequence. The first option
which parses is chosen, the others are not tested any more. If none
matches, a «SyntaxError» is raised.
>>
p > Example:
Code
||
>>> number = re.compile(r"\d+")
>>> parse("hello", ◊[number, word]◊)
'hello'
||
h4 > Composing
p >>
The elements of the «list» are tried out in their sequence, if one of
them can be composed. If none can a «ValueError» is raised.
>>
p > Example:
Code
||
>>> letters = re.compile(r"[a-zA-Z]")
>>> number = re.compile(r"\d+")
>>> compose(23, ◊[letters, number]◊)
'23'
||
h3 id=none > Constant None
p >>
«None» parses to nothing. And it composes to nothing. It represents
the no-operation value.
>>
h2 id=goclasses > Grammar Element Classes
h3 id=symbol > Class Symbol
h4 > Class definition
p > «Symbol(str)»
p > Used to scan a «Symbol».
p >>
If you're putting a «Symbol» somewhere in your «grammar», then
«Symbol.regex» is used to scan while parsing. The result will be a
«Symbol» instance. Optionally it is possible to check that a «Symbol»
instance will not be identical to any «Keyword» instance. This can be
helpful if the source language forbids that.
>>
p >>
A class which is derived from «Symbol» can have an «Enum» as its
«grammar» only. Other values for its «grammar» are forbidden and will
raise a «TypeError». If such an «Enum» is specified, each parsed value
will be checked if being a member of this «Enum» additionally to the
«RegEx» matching.
>>
h4 > Class variables
glossary {
term "regex"
> regular expression to scan, default «re.compile(r"\w+")»
term "check_keywords"
> flag if a «Symbol» has to be checked for not being a «Keyword»; default: «False»
}
h4 > Instance variables
glossary
term "name" > name of the «Keyword» as «str» instance
h4 > Method «__init__(self, name, namespace=None)»
p > Construct a «Symbol» with that «name» in «namespace».
h5 > Raises:
glossary {
term "ValueError"
> if «check_keywords» is «True» and value is identical to a «Keyword»
term "TypeError"
> if «namespace» is given and not an instance of «Namespace»
}
h4 > Parsing
p >>
Parsing a «Symbol» is done by scanning with «Symbol.regex». In our
example we're using the «name()» function, which is often used to parse
a «Symbol». «name()» equals to «attr("name", Symbol)».
>>
p > Example:
Code
||
>>> ◊Symbol.regex = re.compile(r"[\w\s]+")◊
>>> class Key(str):
... grammar = ◊name()◊, "=", restline, endl
...
>>> k = parse("this one=foo bar", Key)
>>> k.name
◊Symbol('this one')◊
>>> k
'foo bar'
||
h4 > Composing
p > Composing a «Symbol» is done by converting it to text.
p > Example:
Code
||
>>> k.name = ◊Symbol("that one")◊
>>> compose(k)
'◊that one◊=foo bar'
||
h3 id=keyword > Class Keyword
h4 > Class definition
p > «Keyword(Symbol)»
p > Used to access the keyword table.
p >>
The «Keyword» class is meant to be instanciated for each «Keyword» of
the source language. The class holds the keyword table as a «Namespace»
instance. There is the abbreviation «K» for «Keyword». The latter is
useful for instancing keywords.
>>
h4 > Class variables
glossary {
term "regex" > regular expression to scan; default «re.compile(r"\w+")»
term "table" > «Namespace» with keyword table
}
h4 > Instance variables
glossary
term "name" > name of the «Keyword» as «str» instance
h4 > Method «__init__(self, keyword)»
p > Adds «keyword» to the keyword table.
h4 > Parsing
p >>
When a «Keyword» instance is parsed, it is removed and nothing is put
into the resulting AST. When a «Keyword» class is parsed, an
instance is created and put into the AST.
>>
p > Example:
Code
||
>>> class ◊Type(Keyword)◊:
... grammar = ◊Enum( K("int"), K("long") )◊
...
>>> k = parse("long", ◊Type◊)
>>> k.name
'long'
||
h4 > Composing
p >>
When a «Keyword» instance is in a «grammar», it is converted into a
«str» instance, and the resulting text is added to the result. When a
«Keyword» class is in the «grammar», the correspoding instance in the
AST is converted into a «str» instance and added to the result.
>>
p > Example:
Code
||
>>> k = ◊K("do")◊
>>> compose(k)
'do'
||
h3 id=list > Class List
h4 > Class definition
p > «List(list)»
p > A List of things.
p >>
A «List» is a collection for parsed things. It can be used as a base class
for collections in the «grammar». If a «List» class has no class
variable «grammar», «grammar = csl(Symbol)» is assumed.
>>
h4 > Method «__init__(self, L=[], **kwargs)»
p >>
Construct a List, and construct its attributes from keyword
arguments.
>>
h4 > Parsing
p >>
A «List» is parsed by following its «grammar». If a «List» is parsed,
then all things which are parsed and which are not attributes are
appended to the «List».
>>
p > Example:
Code
||
>>> class Instruction(str): pass
...
>>> class ◊Block(List)◊:
... grammar = "{", maybe_some(Instruction), "}"
...
>>> b = parse("{ ◊hello world◊ }", ◊Block◊)
>>> b◊[0]◊
'hello'
>>> b◊[1]◊
'world'
>>>
||
h4 > Composing
p >>
If a «List» is composed, then its grammar is followed and composed.
>>
p > Example:
Code
||
>>> class Instruction(str): pass
...
>>> class ◊Block(List)◊:
... grammar = "{", blank, csl(Instruction), blank, "}"
...
>>> b = Block()
>>> b.◊append(Instruction("hello"))◊
>>> b.◊append(Instruction("world"))◊
>>> compose(b)
'{ hello, world }'
||
h3 id=namespace > Class Namespace
h4 > Class definition
p > «Namespace(_UserDict)»
p > A dictionary of things, indexed by their name.
p >>
A Namespace holds an «OrderedDict» mapping the «name» attributes of the
collected things to their respective representation instance. Unnamed
things cannot be collected with a «Namespace».
>>
h4 > Method «__init__(self, *args, **kwargs)»
p >>
Initialize an OrderedDict containing the data of the Namespace.
Arguments are put into the Namespace, keyword arguments give the
attributes of the Namespace.
>>
h4 > Parsing
p >>
A «Namespace» is parsed by following its «grammar». If a «Namespace» is
parsed, then all things which are parsed and which are not attributes
are appended to the «Namespace» and indexed by their «name»
attribute.
>>
p > Example:
Code
||
>>> Symbol.regex = re.compile(r"[\w\s]+")
>>> class Key(str):
... grammar = ◊name()◊, "=", restline, endl
...
>>> class Section(◊Namespace◊):
... grammar = "[", ◊name()◊, "]", endl, maybe_some(Key)
...
>>> class IniFile(◊Namespace◊):
... grammar = some(Section)
...
>>> ini_file_text = """[Number 1]
... this=something
... that=something else
... [Number 2]
... once=anything
... twice=goes
... """
>>> ini_file = parse(ini_file_text, IniFile)
>>> ini_file◊["Number 2"]["once"]◊
'anything'
||
h4 > Composing
p >>
If a «Namespace» is composed, then its grammar is followed and
composed.
>>
p > Example:
Code
||
>>> ini_file◊["Number 1"]["that"]◊ = Key("new one")
>>> ini_file◊["Number 3"]◊ = Section()
>>> print(◊compose(ini_file)◊)
[Number 1]
this=something
that=new one
[Number 2]
once=anything
twice=goes
[Number 3]
||
h3 id=enum > Class Enum
h4 > Class definition
p > «Enum(Namespace)»
p >>
A Namespace which is treated as an Enum. Enums can only contain
«Keyword» or «Symbol» instances. An «Enum» cannot be modified after
creation. An «Enum» is allowed as the grammar of a «Symbol» only.
>>
h4 > Method «__init__(self, *things)»
p > Construct an «Enum» using a «tuple» of things.
h4 > Parsing
p >>
An «Enum» is parsed as a selection for possible values for a «Symbol».
If a value is parsed which is not member of the «Enum», a «SyntaxError»
is raised.
>>
p > Example:
Code
||
>>> class Type(Keyword):
... grammar = ◊Enum( K("int"), K("long") )◊
...
>>> parse("int", Type)
Type('int')
>>> parse("string", Type)
Traceback (most recent call last):
File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
File "pypeg2/__init__.py", line 382, in parse
t, r = parser.parse(text, thing)
File "pypeg2/__init__.py", line 469, in parse
raise r
File "<string>", line 1
string
^
SyntaxError: 'string' is not a member of Enum([Keyword('int'),
Keyword('long')])
>>>
||
h4 > Composing
p >>
When a «Symbol» is composed which has an «Enum» as its grammar, the
composed value is checked if it is a member of the «Enum». If not, a
«ValueError» is raised.
>>
Code
||
>>> class Type(Keyword):
... grammar = ◊Enum( K("int"), K("long") )◊
...
>>> t = Type("int")
>>> compose(t)
'int'
>>> t = Type("string")
>>> compose(t)
Traceback (most recent call last):
File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
File "pypeg2/__init__.py", line 403, in compose
return parser.compose(thing, grammar)
File "pypeg2/__init__.py", line 819, in compose
raise ValueError(repr(thing) + " is not in " + repr(grammar))
ValueError: Type('string') is not in Enum([Keyword('int'),
Keyword('long')])
||
h2 id=ggfunc > Grammar generator functions
p >>
Grammar generator function generate a piece of a «grammar». They're
meant to be used in a «grammar» directly.
>>
h3 id=some > Function some()
h4 > Synopsis
p > «some(*thing)»
p >>
At least one occurrence of thing, + operator. Inserts «-2» as
cardinality before thing.
>>
h4 > Parsing
p >>
Parsing «some()» parses at least one occurence of «thing», or as many
as there are. If there aren't things then a «SyntaxError» is generated.
>>
p > Example:
Code
||
>>> w = parse("hello world", ◊some(word)◊)
>>> w
['hello', 'world']
>>> w = parse("", ◊some(word)◊)
Traceback (most recent call last):
File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
File "pypeg2/__init__.py", line 390, in parse
t, r = parser.parse(text, thing)
File "pypeg2/__init__.py", line 477, in parse
raise r
File "<string>", line 1
^
SyntaxError: expecting match on \w+
||
h4 > Composing
p >>
Composing «some()» composes as many things as there are, but at least
one. If there is no matching thing, a «ValueError» is raised.
>>
p > Example:
Code
||
>>> class Words(List):
... grammar = ◊some(word, blank)◊
...
>>> compose(Words("hello", "world"))
'hello world '
>>> compose(Words())
Traceback (most recent call last):
File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
File "pypeg2/__init__.py", line 414, in compose
return parser.compose(thing, grammar)
File "pypeg2/__init__.py", line 931, in compose
result = compose_tuple(thing, thing[:], grammar)
File "pypeg2/__init__.py", line 886, in compose_tuple
raise ValueError("not enough things to compose")
ValueError: not enough things to compose
>>>
||
h3 id=maybesome > Function maybe_some()
h4 > Synopsis
p > «maybe_some(*thing)»
p >>
No thing or some of them, * operator. Inserts «-1» as cardinality
before thing.
>>
h4 > Parsing
p >>
Parsing «maybe_some()» parses all occurrences of «thing». If there
aren't things then the result is empty.
>>
p > Example:
Code
||
>>> parse("hello world", ◊maybe_some(word)◊)
['hello', 'world']
>>> parse("", ◊maybe_some(word)◊)
[]
||
h4 > Composing
p > Composing «maybe_some()» composes as many things as there are.
Code
||
>>> class Words(List):
... grammar = ◊maybe_some(word, blank)◊
...
>>> compose(Words("hello", "world"))
'hello world '
>>> compose(Words())
''
||
h3 id=optional > Function optional()
h4 > Synopsis
p > «optional(*thing)»
p > Thing or no thing, ? operator. Inserts «0» as cardinality before thing.
h4 > Parsing
p >>
Parsing «optional()» parses one occurrence of «thing». If there
aren't things then the result is empty.
>>
p > Example:
Code
||
>>> parse("hello", ◊optional(word)◊)
['hello']
>>> parse("", ◊optional(word)◊)
[]
>>> number = re.compile("[-+]?\d+")
>>> parse("-23 world", (◊optional(word)◊, number, word))
['-23', 'world']
||
h4 > Composing
p > Composing «optional()» composes one thing if there is any.
p > Example:
Code
||
>>> class OptionalWord(str):
... grammar = ◊optional(word)◊
...
>>> compose(OptionalWord("hello"))
'hello'
>>> compose(OptionalWord())
''
||
h3 id=csl > Function csl()
h4 > Synopsis
h5 > Python 3.x:
p > «csl(*thing, separator=",")»
h5 > Python 2.7:
p > «csl(*thing)»
p > Generate a grammar for a simple comma separated list.
p >>
«csl(Something)» generates
«Something, maybe_some(",", blank, Something)»
>>
h3 id=attr > Function attr()
h4 > Synopsis
p > «attr(name, thing=word, subtype=None)»
p >>
Generate an «Attribute» with that «name», referencing the «thing». An
«Attribute» is a «namedtuple("Attribute", ("name", "thing"))».
>>
h4 > Instance variables
glossary
term "Class" > reference to «Attribute» class generated by «namedtuple()»
h4 > Parsing
p >>
An «Attribute» is parsed following its grammar in «thing». The result
is not put into another thing directly; instead the result is added as
an attribute to containing thing.
>>
p > Example:
Code
||
>>> class Type(Keyword):
... grammar = Enum( K("int"), K("long") )
...
>>> class Parameter:
... grammar = ◊attr("typing", Type)◊, blank, name()
...
>>> p = parse("int a", Parameter)
>>> ◊p.typing◊
Type('int')
||
h4 > Composing
p > An «Attribute» is cmposed following its grammar in «thing».
p > Example:
Code
||
>>> p = Parameter()
>>> ◊p.typing◊ = K("int")
>>> p.name = "x"
>>> compose(p)
'int x'
||
h3 id=flag > Function flag()
h4 > Synopsis
p > «flag(name, thing=None)»
p >>
Generate an «Attribute» with that «name» which is valued «True» or
«False». If no «thing» is given, «Keyword(name)» is assumed.
>>
h4 > Parsing
p >>
A «flag» is usually a «Keyword» which can be there or not. If it is
there, the resulting value is «True». If it is not there, the resulting
value is «False».
>>
p > Example:
Code
||
>>> class BoolLiteral(Symbol):
... grammar = Enum( K("True"), K("False") )
...
>>> class Fact:
... grammar = name(), K("is"), ◊flag("negated", K("not"))◊, \\
... attr("value", BoolLiteral)
...
>>> f1 = parse("a is not True", Fact)
>>> f2 = parse("b is False", Fact)
>>> f1.name
Symbol('a')
>>> f1.value
BoolLiteral('True')
>>> ◊f1.negated◊
True
>>> ◊f2.negated◊
False
||
h4 > Composing
p >>
If the «flag» is «True» compose the grammar. If the «flag» is «False»
don't compose anything.
>>
p > Example:
Code
||
>>> class ValidSign:
... grammar = ◊flag("invalid", K("not"))◊, blank, "valid"
...
>>> v = ValidSign()
>>> ◊v.invalid = True◊
>>> compose(v)
'◊not◊ valid'
||
h3 id=name > Function name()
h4 > Synopsis
p > «name()»
p >>
Generate a grammar for a Symbol with a name. This is a shortcut for
«attr("name", Symbol)».
>>
h3 id=ignore > Function ignore()
h4 > Synopsis
p > «ignore(*grammar)»
p > Ignore what matches to the grammar.
h4 > Parsing
p >>
Parse what's to be ignored. The result is added to an attribute
named «"_ignore" + str(i)» with i as a serial number.
>>
h4 > Composing
p >>
Compose the result as with any «attr()».
>>
h3 id=indent > Function indent()
h4 > Synopsis
p > «indent(*thing)»
p >>
Indent thing by one level.
>>
h4 > Parsing
p >>
The «indent» function has no meaning while parsing. The parameters are
parsed as if they would be in a «tuple».
>>
h4 > Composing
p >>
While composing the «indent» function increases the level of indention.
>>
p > Example:
Code
||
>>> class Instruction(str):
... grammar = word, ";", endl
...
>>> class Block(List):
... grammar = "{", endl, maybe_some(◊indent(Instruction)◊), "}"
...
>>> print(compose(Block(Instruction("first"), \\
... Instruction("second"))))
{
◊ first;◊
◊ second;◊
}
||
h3 id=contiguous > Function contiguous()
h4 > Synopsis
p > «contiguous(*thing)»
p >>
Temporary disable automated whitespace removing while parsing «thing».
>>
h4 > Parsing
p >>
While parsing whitespace removing is disabled. That means, if
whitespace is not part of the grammar, it will lead to a «SyntaxError»
if whitespace will be found between the parsed objects.
>>
p > Example:
Code
||
class Path(List):
grammar = flag("relative", "."), maybe_some(Symbol, ".")
class Reference(GrammarElement):
grammar = ◊contiguous(◊attr("path", Path), name()◊)◊
||
h4 > Composing
p >>
While composing the «contiguous» function has no effect.
>>
h3 id=separated > Function separated()
h4 > Synopsis
p > «separated(*thing)»
p >>
Temporary enable automated whitespace removing while parsing «thing».
Whitespace removing is enabled by default. This function is for
temporary enabling whitespace removing after it was disabled with the
«contiguous» function.
>>
h4 > Parsing
p >>
While parsing whitespace removing is enabled again. That means, if
whitespace is not part of the grammar, it will be omitted if whitespace
will be found between parsed objects.
>>
h4 > Composing
p >>
While composing the «separated» function has no effect.
>>
h3 id=omit > Function omit()
h4 > Synopsis
p > «omit(*thing)»
p >>
Omit what matches the grammar. This function cuts out «thing» and
throws it away.
>>
h4 > Parsing
p >>
While parsing «omit()» cuts out what matches the grammar «thing» and
throws it away.
>>
p > Example:
Code
||
>>> p = parse("hello", omit(Symbol))
>>> print(p)
None
>>> _
||
h4 > Composing
p >>
While composing «omit()» does not compose text for what matches the
grammar «thing».
>>
p > Example:
Code
||
>>> compose(Symbol('hello'), omit(Symbol))
''
>>> _
||
h2 id=callbacks > Callback functions
p >>
Callback functions are called while composing only. They're ignored
while parsing.
>>
h3 id=blank > Callback function blank()
h4 > Synopsis
p > «blank(thing, parser)»
p > Space marker for composing text.
p > «blank» is outputting a space character (ASCII 32) when called.
h3 id=endl > Callback function endl()
h4 > Synopsis
p > «endl(thing, parser)»
p > End of line marker for composing text.
p >>
«endl» is outputting a linefeed charater (ASCII 10) when called. The
indention system reacts when reading «endl» while composing.
>>
h3 id=udcf > User defined callback functions
h4 > Synopsis
p > «callback_function(thing, parser)»
p >>
Arbitrary callback functions can be defined and put into the «grammar».
They will be called while composing.
>>
p > Example:
Code {
""">>> class Instruction(str):
... ◊def heading(self, parser):◊
... ◊ return "/* on level " + str(parser.indention_level) \\\\◊
... ◊ + " */", endl◊
... grammar = ◊heading◊, word, ";", endl
...
>>> print(compose(Instruction("do_this")))
◊/* on level 0 */◊
do_this;
"""
}
h2 id=common > Common class methods for grammar elements
p >>
If a method of the following is present in a grammar element, it will
override the standard behaviour.
>>
h3 id=override_parse > parse() class method of a grammar element
h4 > Synopsis
p > «parse(cls, parser, text, pos)»
p >>
Overwrites the parsing behaviour. If present, this class method is
called at each place the grammar references the grammar element instead
of automatic parsing.
>>
glossary {
term "cls" > class object of the grammar element
term "parser" > parser object which is calling
term "text" > text to be parsed
term "pos" > «(lineNo, charInText)» with positioning information
}
h3 id=override_compose > compose() method of a grammar element
h4 > Synopsis
p > «compose(cls, parser)»
p >>
Overwrites the composing behaviour. If present, this class method is
called at each place the grammar references the grammar element instead
of automatic composing.
>>
glossary {
term "cls" > class object of the grammar element
term "parser" > parser object which is calling
}
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}
}